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THE INTESTINAL MICROBIOME IN HUMAN HEALTH AND DISEASE

HERBERT L. DUPONT, MD, MACP (by invitation),ZHI-DONG JIANG, MD, DRPh, ANDREW W. DUPONT, MD, and NETANYA S. UTAY, MD

Trans Am Clin Climatol Assoc. 2020; 131: 178–197.



Abstract

The Human Microbiome Initiative of NIH, begun in 2007, has opened the door to the power of the intestinal microbiome in health and disease. The 100 trillion gut microbes influence body function through three pathways: (1) via the neural route where 500 million neurons of the enteric nervous system (the body's second brain) connect to the brain and spinal cord, (2) via the immune route where the gut-immune capacity prevents infection and elicits immune response to vaccines, and (3) by the hormonal route wherein biologically active chemicals are released from enteroendocrine cells to control mood and body functions. Through research, the identification of diseases and disorders associated with abnormal microbiome (“dysbiosis”) has increased in number with potential for reversibility. Our team has developed an orally administered fecal microbiota transplantation product that is effective in reversing dysbiosis in recurrent Clostridioides difficile (C. difficile) and is being used to reverse abnormal microbiomes in chronic dysbiotic disorders.




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